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Chevy Has Tim Allen Feed Your Range Anxiety

Posted in auto industry, Car Buying, Cars, Chevrolet, Electric Cars, Videos by Kurt Ernst | October 28th, 2010 | 2 Responses |

Tim Allen has been doing Chevy ads for a while now, and his current piece on the Chevy Volt is designed to play on the range anxiety faced by electric car shoppers. Plans made at 9:00 don’t necessarily apply at 5:00, Allen tells us, and he’s absolutely right about that. I’m not sure many of us have time for his “spontaneous acts of freedom”, but I’m digging the sentiment: as Americans, it’s out birthright to jump in a car, point it in a given direction and just go. All of us have our “Great American Road Trip” stories, and an epic on the road adventure just isn’t possible in a car that limits you to 40 miles of highway cruising before it needs 8 hours of recharging.

There’s some sad irony in Allen’s comments that “we’re wanderers, wayfarers, even nomads”; as the U.S. economy continues to get progressively worse, that’s exactly what we’re becoming. Just like in the Great Depression, people are beginning to shuffle from place to place, city to city, in search of a job or a better life. Not many of us have the luxury of worrying about range anxiety; instead, most of us are worrying about how we’re going to pay the mortgage or feed our families in a few months.

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2 Responses

  1. Taylor says:

    “Birthright”

    Okay, see that’s the problem. Everybody believes that it is their “birthright” to jump in a car and go, even myself, but how many actually take advantage of just going?

    More often than not, the car is used to turn ten minute walk into a two minute drive or to go to work an back again (which an electric car would suffice).

    As long as people ardently hang on to the romanticism of road trips, without actually partaking in them, we will never see electric cars take off.

  2. Kurt says:

    Taylor, I see the opposite side of the coin: until electric cars offer comparable range, comparable purchase cost and a comparable lifespan to internal combustion cars they won’t take off. Serial hybrids, like the Chevy Volt, offer the best compromise available today, but no one really knows how long the batteries will last (or what to do with them beyond their service life).

    I’m all for electric cars, since the performance has the capability of exceeding internal combustion cars, but the battery technology just isn’t there today.